Pam & Tommy Movie Review and Movie Synopsis (2022)

As an idiot-on-parade heist comedy, it sort of works – Rogen is still a dependable man, finding layers of sympathy in a dopey dude very clearly out of his depth and operating entirely on impulse. But it’s hard not to feel that every time we cut to see Rand’s pathetic shenanigans (including, possibly, having to turn into a reluctant mob enforcer for Andrew Dice Clay’s loan shark villain), it takes a lot of time away from the real focus of the story: Pamela Anderson and the effect of the gang on her career, her marriage and her life.

It’s those components that work best, thanks in large part to James’ superb turn as Pamela. While she doesn’t completely disappear into the role – Anderson, whatever you can say about her as a performer is impossible to replicate – James’ physical transformation (including pouty lips, a breathy Marilyn Monroe whisper and a visibly ample chest plate) gets quite close. What’s more, James is doing her a favor by eschewing the tabloid caricature of Anderson as a dumb bimbo, instead playing it with refreshing self-awareness and welcome ambition, blind as she may be. (You don’t need hindsight to realize that Pamela Anderson shouldn’t have pinned her movie star hopes on something like “Barb Wire.”)

While the show is clearly Pam’s story, we can’t forget Tommy, played with childlike volatility by Stan. On the one hand, Stan’s Tommy is cartoonish, a trigger-happy jester as driven by his dick as anything else. (One of the most bizarre scenes in the series literalizes this, as he has a heart-to-headset conversation with his own huge, prehensile member, voiced by Jason Mantzoukas.) On the other, his love for Pamela is right there. on the surface, peeking through layers of tattoos and the bro-code mores of the heavy metal dipshit subculture he rides in. It’s not nearly on the same level as James’s, but Stan is engaging moment to moment, and hopefully he gets more chances out of his Marvel contract to stretch his acting legs like this .


Source link

Comments are closed.