Living history, music, exhibits at 11th Annual Civil War Event

This year, representatives of 142nd PVI Company G, which was formed in Stroudsburg and used men from Monroe and Pike counties, will bring to life what the people of that area and the country experienced at the time. troubled by the American Civil War. Living history and exhibits will include soldiers in camp life, their uniforms, what they ate, how they cooked, the weapons they used; as well as women’s fashions of the day, toys of the time and a real “grandmother”, the local woman who knew which plants and everyday household items could be used to care for, clean and many other uses of daily life.

Also present this year is Company A of the 7th NJ Volunteer Infantry, which was formed in the spring of 1861 and served in nearly every major Civil War battle until General Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. They will have a display of Civil War medical supplies and medicines.

Some of the soldiers will settle in and spend the night on Friday, while others will arrive early Saturday morning. The event opens to the public at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 21. Guests are welcome to tour the grounds and view the exhibits and demonstrations as well as tour the museum – all for a general admission price of $10. Children under 12 are free. There will be live music from the era performed by The Bard of the Hills from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. and food and drink will be available for purchase from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.

The Pike County Historical Society offers programs that educate about history and provide insight into the past, to remember the trials and tribulations that happened before today and the men and women who went through them. The museum will forever be tied to the Civil War because of a treasured artifact – Lincoln’s flag. The Lincoln Flag is a large 36-star flag used for the decoration of Ford’s Theater on April 14, 1865 – the night President Lincoln was shot.

The flag was placed under his head as he lay on the floor of the presidential box – dying. After being taken across the street to the Peterson house, where he would die the next morning, several of the flags used to decorate the theater that evening were taken. Lincoln’s flag, stained with the blood of the 16th President of the United States, was brought to Milford in 1888 by Jeannie Gourlay, an actress in the play That Fateful Night (Our American Cousin). Gourlay kept the flag at her Water Street home in Milford until her death in 1928. She left the flag to her son Vivian Paul. He donated the flag to the Pike County Historical Society in 1954.

The event opens to the public at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 21. Guests are welcome to tour the grounds and view the exhibits and demonstrations as well as tour the museum – all for a general admission price of $10. Children under 12 are free. There will be live music from the era performed by The Bard of the Hills from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. and food and drink will be available for purchase from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.


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