Monroe music – Monroe Swifts http://monroeswifts.org/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 15:01:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://monroeswifts.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png Monroe music – Monroe Swifts http://monroeswifts.org/ 32 32 Dailey & Vincent extend American Made Music Festival dates to 2022 – Billboard https://monroeswifts.org/dailey-vincent-extend-american-made-music-festival-dates-to-2022-billboard/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 15:01:16 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/dailey-vincent-extend-american-made-music-festival-dates-to-2022-billboard/ In 2013, three-time Grammy nominees Dailey & Vincent launched LandFest, their own music festival in Denton, North Carolina. In 2017, needing a bigger room, they moved to the Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds in Hiawassee, GA. “In the third year, we had to raise the large doors of Hiawassee, which opened onto an outdoor space. We noticed […]]]>

In 2013, three-time Grammy nominees Dailey & Vincent launched LandFest, their own music festival in Denton, North Carolina. In 2017, needing a bigger room, they moved to the Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds in Hiawassee, GA.

“In the third year, we had to raise the large doors of Hiawassee, which opened onto an outdoor space. We noticed that the lawn was completely filled with chairs and there was no more room for ticket buyers. We knew then that it was time to grow up, ”the group said. Jamie Dailey recount Billboard.

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Instead of moving again, Dailey and his musical partner Darrin vincent take a big step forward with the flagship three-day festival, expanding to five festivals in four locations this year and rebranding the series as The American Made Music Festival series.

The first festival will launch June 10-11 at the Sand Mountain Amphitheater in Albertville, Alabama. Four festivals will follow September 15-17 (Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds in Hiawassee, GA), October 7-8 (Jackson County Airport in Gainesboro, Tenn.), November 11-12 (Capitol Theater in Wheeling , West Virginia) and December 2-3 (a return to the Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds in Hiawassee, Ga., as part of ChristmasFest). The group worked with their management company, APEX Entertainment Management, to create the festival series, presented by Springer Mountain Farms. Estimated attendance for festivals ranges from 2,500 to around 6,000 people.

Bluegrass music is a genre that pairs well with music festivals, with a history of artist-hosted festivals. The Bean Blossom Bluegrass Music Festival of Bill Monroe, the “father of bluegrass,” began in the mid-1960s. Dr Ralph Stanley started the Hills of Home Bluegrass Festival in 1970. Last year marked the 41st Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver Bluegrass Festival. In honor of the late Earl Scruggs, the Earl Scruggs Music Festival is scheduled to begin in September. These are in addition to many other long-standing bluegrass festivals, including the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, RockyGrass, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, the Festival of the Bluegrass, the IBMA Fan Fest of the International Bluegrass Music Association, and Moreover.

Dailey & Vincent’s American Made Music Festival series will stay in the South for now.

“We’ve played all over the world and we love our fans everywhere,” said Dailey. “But we knew that launching these festivals closer to our home port would be more manageable for us by traveling quickly to or from when needed. We are looking at spaces in the west and north, and we hope to announce some in the future. “

Dailey & Vincent, as well as their manager, APEX Entertainment Management’s Zac Koffler, were strategic in the selection of each venue for the festival. Vincent attributes to Romeo Entertainment Group RJ Romeo mentioning the location of Sand Mountain Park & ​​Amphitheater in Albertville as an option in Koffler. Last year they added a festival in Dailey’s hometown of Gainesboro, Tennessee at the Jackson County Airport, and are returning to that location this year.

“Is it cool to have the opportunity to organize a festival on an airport runway?” Said Vincent.

As companies like Live Nation and AEG dominate the music festival space, the group is carving out a list of niche festivals for fans of country, gospel and bluegrass.

“We have great respect for these companies, but I think we’re making our own way with more traditional music and entertainment festivals,” Vincent says.

The list of festivals further strengthens a multi-faceted brand the group has been building for over a decade, since their fierce breakthrough year with their self-titled debut album in 2008 (at that year’s IBMA Awards they went from new Artist of the Year from winners to the coveted Artist of the Year winners in an awards ceremony, scoring seven wins over the course of the evening).

They have since landed six No.1 albums on BillboardBluegrass Albums Chart, won three Grammy nominations in the country and bluegrass categories, won four Dove Awards from the Gospel Music Association, and was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry. They’ve also made their foray into television, both with a focus on a special PBS concert and with their three-time Emmy nominee. The Dailey & Vincent show. The weekly show, which launched in 2015, airs on Circle Network and features a mix of country, bluegrass and gospel artists. Musically, they have continued to diversify, releasing a gospel album in 2012 and their first Christmas album in 2018.

Dailey & Vincent take a similar cross-genre approach to organizing the performances of each festival. At all five festivals, fans can expect country artists including Josh Turner, Martina McBride, Gene Watson, Diamond Rio and former Statler Brothers frontman Jimmy Fortune (in 2010 Dailey & Vincent released an album of songs of the Statler Brothers), as well as bands The Isaacs and Primitive Quartet, bluegrass / country artist Bradley Walker and more. As a nod to their relationship with the Opry, at least one festival lineup includes a tribute performance to Opry, with other artists to be announced soon.

“Bringing a wide range of talent to our festivals is a balancing act,” says Vincent. “Working with our friends and colleagues in the Grand Ole Opry family is not only good for the consumer, but also good and fun for us. It’s very difficult to schedule our festivals, and we rely on our partners for guidance and wisdom when selecting a talent lineup.

And while the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged music tours and festivals of all sizes, Dailey & Vincent and their team have made progress in organizing festivals, including last year’s events in Hiawassee, Georgia, and in Gainesboro, Tenn. Disinfection and hand washing stations have been set up everywhere for the participants.

“Masks weren’t mandatory, but if you felt the need to wear one, it was up to you. We have done our part by avoiding welcome meetings or signing autographs, and have kept backstage access to a minimum, ”said Vincent. “People in general are pretty cautious. In our organization, if you feel sick or have a fever, we ask that you stay home. I know there were a few people with existing health issues who chose not to come, and we think that’s a smart choice.

“We encourage everyone who attends our festivals to be cautious and take whatever action they need to take that they believe will help keep them safe,” Dailey said.

In the future, they hope to add more festivals over the next five years or so.

“At this point five is a lot, but we would like to increase it to six or seven, moving southwest with a couple,” Vincent says.

And the long-term goal?

“I’d like us to end at around 25 or so,” Dailey says.


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Music Biz Headlines, January 10, 2022 https://monroeswifts.org/music-biz-headlines-january-10-2022/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/music-biz-headlines-january-10-2022/ Vinyl’s popularity dampens drop in album sales in Canada: industry report Ten years ago, it would have been unthinkable that vinyl records could mitigate the decline in Canadian music sales, but a new industry roundup indicates that this is exactly what the popularity of physical records has done. in 2021. MRC Data reports that 1.1 […]]]>

Vinyl’s popularity dampens drop in album sales in Canada: industry report

Ten years ago, it would have been unthinkable that vinyl records could mitigate the decline in Canadian music sales, but a new industry roundup indicates that this is exactly what the popularity of physical records has done. in 2021. MRC Data reports that 1.1 million vinyl records were sold in Canada last year, a 21.7% increase from 2020 when sales fell due to Covid and supply issues . The latest figures surpassed the record 1.03 million units sold in 2019. – David Friend, CP

NEXT’s best albums of 2021

While we were locked in, wasting time glued to Bridgerton, Selling Sunset and Yellowstone, our favorite artists were working hard. – Staff, FOLLOWING Magazine

Despite obstacles caused by Covid, the Toronto choir remains intact and prepared for the next live show

After Ontario eased public health restrictions last October, the ECC met at the Etobicoke church where they had practiced for a long time before the pandemic. They opened the windows to the cold autumn air and sprawled out on the benches, still a little nervous after months of loneliness. – Ben Mussett, Globe and Mail

5 bold predictions for Toronto’s music scene in 2022

This year, expect more emphasis on concert safety, artist labor rights and more from NFT. – Richard Trapunski, NOW

Arbitrary closures show most Canadian executives place little value on artists

In Ontario, all indoor art venues of all kinds are now closed as provincial governments face the highly transmissible variant Omicron with very different regulations. – Kate Taylor, The Globe and Mail

The Rising Stars of 2021: Here are the young artists who had a very good year

2021 has turned out to be particularly good for a number of artists in Calgary and the Calgary area. From actors landing their first major roles to successful writers and teenage TikTok stars, here are 10 rising stars whose careers have seen an impressive rise this year. – Eric Volmers, Calgary Herald

The Weeknd dances to death in disco-inspired ‘Dawn FM’

The 52-minute electronics and R&B-focused opus that serves as its fifth studio album finds Abel Tesfaye at his peak, writes Nick Krewen. – Toronto Star

The Weeknd’s New Album “Dawn FM” Released: Here’s All You Need To Know

The Toronto-born, Scarborough-raised artist has been very busy leading up to the release of his highly anticipated fifth album. Here are all the details. – Richie Assaly, Toronto Star

The Weeknd: Dawn FM review – a stunning display of absolute pop prowess

If it’s the end of the Weeknd, what a way to bow out. Abel Tesfaye confirms his status as an all-time greats with an album of icy splendor tinged with the 80s. – Alexis Petridis, The Guardian

Timbaland compares The Weeknd’s “Dawn FM” to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller”

“This shit is amazing,” says the star producer. – Will Lavin, NME

The List: the most popular musical with a staycation option

Despite some closings, the Mayfield Dinner Theater in Edmonton has kept its scene alive with Buddy – The Buddy Holly Story. Written by Alan Janes, it was released in 1989 and spanned over 12 years in London’s West End, and with over 22 million viewers to date it has gained a reputation as the world’s most popular musical in the world. – Jenny Feniak, Edmonton Journal

Rush Joins Selected Rock’n’roll Company With Own Pinball Table

Stick around long enough and you’ll find yourself not only cool, but also cool enough to warrant your own pinball machine. One of the real giants of progressive rock, Rush was big in the late 70s and really huge in the early 80s. – Mike Usinger, Georgia Straight

Primus honors legends of prog Rush with A Tribute to Kings at Orpheum Theater on June 12

If you haven’t already spent your entire 2022 entertainment fund allocation on the new Rush pinball machine, here’s another way to pay homage to the Canadian gods of prog-metal. Primus, a fairly decent full-fledged progressive metal trio, will perform A Tribute to Kings at the Orpheum Theater on June 12. – Steve Newton, Georgia Straight

National Music Center CEO wants to show cities how investing in local music can unlock huge potential

The 10th Global Music Cities Convention is scheduled to take place simultaneously in Edmonton and Calgary February 9-11 – hosted by West Anthem, the National Music Center and Alberta Music. The event will highlight the ways in which music can bring collective, economic and cultural benefits to cities that invest in their local music ecosystems. We learn more from the head of NMC, Andrew Mosker. – Daniel Reech, Globe and Mail

“I’ve always been able to see music”: prof. from Saskatoon. hosts the January SJO concert

Allyson Glenn sees the music. A professor of painting and drawing at the University of Saskatchewan, Glenn experiences synesthesia – when a person experiences one of their senses through another. In preparation for a Saskatoon Jazz Orchestra concert in the New Year, Glenn worked closely with two Saskatchewan composers to create video animations based on what she sees when she hears their music. So on January 22, the audience will have the chance to see the music through Glenn’s eyes. – Star-Phoenix

International

More than 82% of the music market in the United States is now claimed by catalog records

We cannot say that 2021 was light on the releases of successful albums. We know all of this because of the numbers in a new annual report released today (January 6) by US market monitor, MRC Data. Yet we also know, from that same report, that the biggest achievement of 2021 in the United States had nothing to do with a new release: it was “catalog” music. – MBW

Adele, BTS, and Taylor Swift help boost US CD sales for first time in 17 years

Adele’s “30s” accounted for over 2 percent of all US CD sales last year. – Jackson Langford, NME

Now John Legend Sells: BMG & KKR Buy Hitmaker All Of Me Catalog

Music’s latest big catalog sale has been confirmed: American singer-songwriter and performer John Legend has sold his songwriting catalog for an undisclosed amount to BMG and KKR. Interestingly, it appears that the sale of Legend to KKR and BMG was finalized before the two companies jointly acquired a catalog from ZZ Top. – Tim Ingham, MBW

Terry Allen on the Texan roots of his music and his art

In a work that spans albums, installations, radio plays and drawings, Allen, who is seventy-eight, talks about the region’s long stretches of deserted roads, drab motels and neon-lit bars, and bank robbers, washed away. the soccer players and the loners of the small towns who inhabit them. The potential for violence, or romance, always seems to buzz beneath the surface. – Rachel Monroe, The New Yorker

Judy Collins Announces Bewitched, his first album of completely original songs

Listen to “When I Was a Girl in Colorado” from the singer-songwriter’s 29th album. – Evan Minsker, fork


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Pennsylvania man sets fire to his house, blows up music in driveway https://monroeswifts.org/pennsylvania-man-sets-fire-to-his-house-blows-up-music-in-driveway/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 20:14:13 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/pennsylvania-man-sets-fire-to-his-house-blows-up-music-in-driveway/ “Beautiful, isn’t it?” “ A man from Pennsylvania decided to make the vacation his own way. And by his own way, we intentionally mean setting his own house on fire. Police have released details of the bizarre incident that occurred on December 3 in Hollidaysburg, Pa. When authorities arrived at the scene, they said the […]]]>

“Beautiful, isn’t it?” “ A man from Pennsylvania decided to make the vacation his own way. And by his own way, we intentionally mean setting his own house on fire. Police have released details of the bizarre incident that occurred on December 3 in Hollidaysburg, Pa. When authorities arrived at the scene, they said the 37-year-old suspect was wearing two bathrobes, as he sat in a car with the doors open and playing music. It was the whole party, though none could confirm whether he was listening or not Burn the house by talking heads.

WETM says the suspect started the day by putting a golf bag on the stove and lighting the burners. But it does not stop there. A fire marshal says the wire to the fire alarm system was cut and also manually disconnected from the back-up battery. Investigators say they also found a tub in the house overflowing with water for some reason.

Once officials finally arrived that day, they discovered the house was on fire as the suspect casually relaxed in his driveway, admiring his work. WETM says he was dressed in two robes, fingerless gloves on the one hand and a golf club on the other. When the authorities asked the man why he had done such a thing, he simply replied;

Beautiful, isn’t it?

WETM says he has been taken into custody. Bail has been denied and a preliminary hearing is scheduled for January 11. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

Meanwhile, an altercation filmed on New Years Eve led to the arrest of a man from the Hudson Valley. Hudson Valley 12 says the man allegedly wielded a knife during an assault in a Walmart area. But aside from the incident itself, what might draw attention here is the suspect’s rather curious first name. Have you ever heard a name like this?

The video doesn’t show how the altercation started, although you can see people on both sides trying to break up and discourage the brawl in Wallkill’s Walmart store. A woman can be heard screaming repeatedly “NO!As the small crowd struggles to defuse the situation. Officials say the knife-wielding suspect has been charged with criminal possession of weapons and threats.

So, that name we were talking about? Authorities say the 27-year-old suspect’s first name is Sirload. Like, the words Sir and load combined into one name. How it is pronounced ? Mister-charge? Seer-Lo-ahd? Scheer-lood? A quick Google search doesn’t bring in a lot of results.

What are the signature drinks of each state?

25 Hudson Valley locations featured in the movies

The Hudson Valley or the New Hollywood? The Hudson Valley has been featured in many movies over the years, and it doesn’t stop. Recent successes like A Quiet Place (2018) to modern classic films like The Missing (2006)The Hudson Valley has been a low-key hot spot for locations. Due to tax incentives, beautiful locations and the growth of independent cinema, the Hudson Valley will continue to thrive as a valuable destination for filmmakers.

So we’ve compiled a list of 25 Hudson Valley locations featured in the movie. This list also includes blockbuster hits and independent films. We hope you enjoy the read and learn more about the Hudson Valley and the movies!

KEEP READING: Here Are The Best Places to Retire in America


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Carter from Winnsboro to be first on Northeast Louisiana’s new music trail https://monroeswifts.org/carter-from-winnsboro-to-be-first-on-northeast-louisianas-new-music-trail/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:54:39 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/carter-from-winnsboro-to-be-first-on-northeast-louisianas-new-music-trail/ A Winnsboro native who became an established multi-instrumentalist appearing on hits during the 1960s and 1970s will be the first artist commemorated in the new Northeast Louisiana Music Trail. The Country Music Hall of Famer Fred Carter, Jr. will be commemorated with a marker as part of the road signs, similar to the famous Mississippi […]]]>

A Winnsboro native who became an established multi-instrumentalist appearing on hits during the 1960s and 1970s will be the first artist commemorated in the new Northeast Louisiana Music Trail.

The Country Music Hall of Famer Fred Carter, Jr. will be commemorated with a marker as part of the road signs, similar to the famous Mississippi Blues Trail, in his hometown of Winnsboro.

Raised on the strong musical influences of jazz, country, western, anthems and blues, Carter made his debut as the principal of “Louisiana Hayride,” a popular country music television show that aired on Shreveport from 1955 to 1960.

Based in Nashville in the early 1960s, Carter became an established session musician, performing on well-known star hits, such as “The Boxer” by Simon and Garfunkel and “Lay Lady Lay” by Bob Dylan. Carter has also worked with Muddy Waters, Waylon Jennings, Dottie Rambo, Dean Martin and Chet Atkins.

Carter died of complications from a stroke in 2010.

On January 29, Country Music Hall of Fame member Fred Carter, Jr. will be honored with a commemoration as part of the Northeast Louisiana Music Trail.

Like the Mississippi Blues Trail, the Northeast Louisiana Music Trail will showcase the region’s musical talent. Trail founder Doyle Jeter said it was a long-held dream for him to honor the immense talents of the region’s musicians.

“After my wife, Yvette, and I opened our concert hall, Enoch’s Pub and Café, in 1980, it became a priority to do just that,” Jeter said. “The priorities change – pay the electric bill and life is hampered.”



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Eastman School of Music postpones concerts to January https://monroeswifts.org/eastman-school-of-music-postpones-concerts-to-january/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 16:46:00 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/eastman-school-of-music-postpones-concerts-to-january/ ROCHESTER, NY – The Eastman School of Music has temporarily suspended concerts due to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the school, all concerts until January 31 are postponed until further notice. School officials say the online calendar will be updated with new dates. The concert postponement announcement comes as the University of Rochester and the […]]]>

ROCHESTER, NY – The Eastman School of Music has temporarily suspended concerts due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to the school, all concerts until January 31 are postponed until further notice. School officials say the online calendar will be updated with new dates.

The concert postponement announcement comes as the University of Rochester and the Eastman School of Music switch to online classes to start the semester. Online learning will be in place until the end of January.

A statement posted on the school’s website Friday said in part:

“As we have done throughout the pandemic, we are following the advice of our university health professionals and the Monroe County Public Health Commissioner when it comes to making related decisions. pandemic. Given the rapid increase in COVID cases in our region, as well as concerns about managing the expected quarantine and isolation needs of our community, their recommendation was to move quickly to teaching in line.

“While neither of us would choose to be in this situation, we have been here before and I am extremely confident in our ability to successfully meet this latest challenge. “

More information on the Eastman School of Music’s spring semester can be found here.


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Auditions, music and more | Local news https://monroeswifts.org/auditions-music-and-more-local-news/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/auditions-music-and-more-local-news/ Catawba County History Museum’s Historian-in-Residence Richard Eller will present the third presentation in a six-part series on West North Carolina furniture at 6 p.m. on January 11 at the Patrick’s Day Beaver Memorial Library. The series will be offered as an in-person and virtual presentation and will run on the second Tuesday of each month […]]]>

Catawba County History Museum’s Historian-in-Residence Richard Eller will present the third presentation in a six-part series on West North Carolina furniture at 6 p.m. on January 11 at the Patrick’s Day Beaver Memorial Library. The series will be offered as an in-person and virtual presentation and will run on the second Tuesday of each month through April. Each session will examine a different aspect of the furniture industry in western North Carolina and highlight elements from Eller’s upcoming book “The Timber Industry – The History of Furniture in Western North Carolina.” North Carolina ”.

January’s presentation will examine the Hickory, Morganton and Lenoir furniture industry as the nation enters WWI. With timber from the North Carolina mountains and a number of supporting companies, from veneer companies to emerging mirrors, the area has made a name for itself for its bedroom, dining room, and living room. Floods, fires and accidents have taken their toll, but local names have become industry leaders. Businesses went through a Great Depression and headed into World War II ready to make a patriotic difference.

Registration is required to receive the Zoom link to the virtual session. To register for the virtual session, call 828-304-0050 or register online at www.hickorync.gov/calendar/events/category/library/. Registration is not required for in-person participation; however, it is limited to 45 people, first come, first served. For more information, call 828-304-0500. The Patrick Beaver Memorial Library is located at 375 Third St., NE, on the SALT block. All library programs are free and open to the public.


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Musical collectibles: the story of the most precious instruments https://monroeswifts.org/musical-collectibles-the-story-of-the-most-precious-instruments/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 03:56:11 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/musical-collectibles-the-story-of-the-most-precious-instruments/ The Beatles on stage with a Ludwig drums valued at over AU $ 3 million | Source: Block Club Chicago Combine a few factors; its creator, quality, condition, famous provenance, age and rarity and chances are the vintage instruments in your garage’s top shelf could be an invaluable work of art. Musical instruments generate significant […]]]>

The Beatles on stage with a Ludwig drums valued at over AU $ 3 million | Source: Block Club Chicago

Combine a few factors; its creator, quality, condition, famous provenance, age and rarity and chances are the vintage instruments in your garage’s top shelf could be an invaluable work of art. Musical instruments generate significant returns and icons such as the legendary Stradivarius violins present a unique investment opportunity.

George Gruhn, a Nashville, US-based guitar dealer, believes they might even offer safer long-term gains than traditional investments.

Musical instruments have been great investments, so I now consider them to be far superior to money in the bank, especially at today’s interest rates, or in most stocks or mutual funds.

Georges gruhn

Here’s a look at the history of some of the most expensive musical instruments ever sold.

Eric Clapton’s Fender Stratocaster

Few guitarists achieve the iconic status of Eric Clapton. Fewer and fewer of their backing guitars came to the revered fame of their Fender Stratocaster, nicknamed “Blackie”. Clapton built the custom guitar using various parts from other Stratocasters, including a 1956 Stratocaster body and 1957 neck. His favorite guitar, Blackie, provided the music for many Clapton hits and in 2004 he l ‘sold for over A $ 1.3 million at a Christie’s auction to raise money for charity.

Eric Clapton with Blackie in Rotterdam on June 23, 1978 | Source: Chris Hakkens

John Lennon Steinway Z Piano

If there is one characteristic that increases the value of an instrument, it is the importance of the character who owned and played it. In the musical world, that doesn’t get much more important than Beatles frontman John Lennon. This Steinway piano, purchased by Lennon in December 1970 for A $ 1,869 from Steinway & Sons in London, was used by the musician to compose the unforgettable song, To imagine.

When the instrument was auctioned in October 2000, notable bidders included Robbie Williams and brothers Liam and Noel Gallagher. Ultimately, the rare musical instrument was sold to George Michael for over A $ 2.7 million, becoming the highest price achieved for a piano at the time.

john-lennon-steinway-model-z-goss-michael-foundation
Source:

Blunt lady Stradivarius violin

The legendary violins built by Antonio Stradivari at the turn of the 18th century remain among the most valuable and expensive instruments in the world. With only around 650 of the instruments still in existence, this is a limited asset whose value is appreciating year after year. The “Lady Blunt” Stradivarius violin, made in 1721, is one of the best-preserved Stradivari-built violins in existence and therefore expensive. The record violin was sold at Sotheby’s in 1971 for a record amount of A $ 156,178. Forty years later, in 2011, the same violin was sold for A $ 22.3 million, again setting a new world record.

The Lady Blunt Stradivarius was Refurbished Almost 40 Years Ago at Carl Becker and Son’s Chicago Studio | Source: Benning Violins

MacDonald Stradivarius alto

Antonio Stradivari was known to have created other famous stringed instruments, including the smaller viola. Made in 1719 around a period considered to be the Golden Period of the Stradivarius, the instrument is believed to be one of 10 Stradivarius violas intact today. In 2014, the prized viola went up for auction with a minimum bid of over A $ 62 million, but unfortunately failed to find a buyer.

MacDonald Stradivarius Alto
Source: CNBC

The Fender Stratocaster “Reach Out to Asia”

To call this rare Fender Stratocaster guitar would be an understatement. This unique piece is signed by legendary musical personalities such as Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Bryan Adams, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger and Brian May. It was then auctioned off in 2005 by the charity “Reach Out to Asia” in Qatar for the benefit of the victims of the tsunami in the Indian Ocean. It grossed over A $ 3.7 million, becoming the most expensive guitar ever sold at the time.

The Fender Stratocaster
Source: Fender Wiki

Ringo Starr Ludwig Drum Kit

Everything about the Beatles echoes great rarity and strong comebacks. A Ludwig Oyster black pearl three-piece drum kit that drummer Ringo Starr owned sold for over AU $ 3 million at Julien’s Auctions in 2015. The drummer, who was the last to join the famous four, has played the kit both on stage and on television in over 200 performances between 1963 and 1964. A piece of musical history, he also used the instrument to record several early Beatles hits including Can’t Buy Me, To like, She loves You, and I want to hold your hand.

Ringo Starr Drum Kit
Ringo Starr with Ludwig drums on stage | Source: fresh water

Marilyn Monroe’s baby grand piano

While Marilyn Monroe passed away nearly 60 years ago, the iconic status of the American actress, model and singer continues. Many of his possessions are among the most collectable items with fans around the world. Originally owned by Marilyn’s mother, her white lacquered grand piano was bought by the famous buyer Mariah Carey at an auction in October 1999 for over 915,000 Australian dollars.

Source: Getty Images

David Gilmour’s Fender Stratocaster

Nicknamed “The Black Strat”, the famous Fender Stratocaster first appeared on stage with Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour in 1970. In addition to accompanying the musician on stage, the black Stratocaster has also featured on the individual songs. by Pink Floyd and Gilmour, in particular Money and comfortably Numb. When the legendary 1969 Black Strat was auctioned in 2019, it grossed over AU $ 5,490,000, setting a new world auction record for a guitar.

David Gilmour 1969 Fender Stratocaster
Source: Guitar World


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Terry Allen on the Texan roots of his music and his art https://monroeswifts.org/terry-allen-on-the-texan-roots-of-his-music-and-his-art/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:07:14 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/terry-allen-on-the-texan-roots-of-his-music-and-his-art/ For more than half a century, artist and musician Terry Allen has drawn inspiration from the Southwest. “It’s space, it’s the horizon,” he told me. “And also the paradox of being so restrictive and conservative on other levels. There are so many crazy people that come from this part of the world – and I […]]]>

For more than half a century, artist and musician Terry Allen has drawn inspiration from the Southwest. “It’s space, it’s the horizon,” he told me. “And also the paradox of being so restrictive and conservative on other levels. There are so many crazy people that come from this part of the world – and I don’t mean crazy in a particular negative way, I just mean say, like, crazy to do things, to do things, to get out of there, to face your life.

Terry Allen.Photograph by James Bland

In a work that spans albums, installations, radio plays and drawings, Allen, who is seventy-eight, talks about the region’s long stretches of deserted roads, drab motels and neon-lit bars, and bank robbers, washed away. the soccer players and the loners of the small towns who inhabit them. The potential for violence, or romance, always seems to buzz beneath the surface.

Allen grew up in Lubbock, selling sodas at the dance hall run by his father, a baseball player turned event promoter; he heard Hank Williams and Little Richard there. At the Los Angeles Art School in the sixties, he frequented the Surrealists and befriended Ed Ruscha. As a musician in the 1970s, he performed at festivals and wrote songs alongside the outlaw elite, releasing two world-building albums with country accents: “Juarez” (1975) and “Lubbock (on everything)” (1979). Although the documents soon run out, they have circulated among those in the know.

Allen quickly became better known for his visual art, an amalgamation of installations, theatrical dramas, video pieces, and lithographs, largely related to his early years in Lubbock. He gathered a series of fans, friends and collaborators – Dave Hickey, David Byrne, Bruce Nauman – who appreciated his eclectic approach to the genre and the edge of the outlaw laugh behind his broad, friendly smile. Country singer Guy Clark, who died in 2016, requested that his ashes be part of a sculpture by Terry Allen. Several years ago, when an interviewer asked Bob Dylan what contemporary art he was following, he said he liked mini-golf and Terry Allen.

Allen’s longest-serving collaborator, however, is his wife, actor and writer Jo Harvey Allen. The couple met in Lubbock when they were eleven and have been more or less together since. “The joke is, we didn’t have sex until we were twelve,” Allen told me when we spoke to each other a few days before Christmas. “Jo Harvey hates this joke.”

Allen’s refusal to stick to just one medium means that he sort of exists as an outsider, even though his work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Hirshhorn. Years ago, the Smithsonian expressed interest in its archives and Allen sent them reel-to-reel tapes with some of his old recordings. When the museum told Allen they were only interested in his visual works, it canceled the deal, instead sending the materials to Texas Tech in Lubbock.

In 2016, North Carolina label Paradise of Bachelors re-released “Juarez” and “Lubbock (on everything),” drawing new attention to Allen. “It was like a whole world was opening up,” he told me. But he and Jo Harvey had never stopped doing things. These days, they live in Santa Fe, where Allen plays in a band that includes the couple’s sons, as well as Charlie Sexton, Dylan’s longtime guitarist. When we spoke, Allen was in Austin setting up an exhibit at the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas. He told me he couldn’t wait to get back to his studio in Santa Fe. “I’ve worked a lot with the work I’ve done before,” he told me. “I am excited to embark on what is to come. “

You were exposed to the entertainment industry early on, but in a very Lubbock way – rock and roll, but also wrestling. I heard a rumor that when you were a kid you met Elvis.

His group was trying to find where the room was, and they stopped by our house to ask where to go. That’s when they were touring in a station wagon with a bass attached to the top and drums in the back, and they were opening act for Little Jimmy Dickens. I think it was Elvis’s first time playing Lubbock.

Did you go to the show?

I work the show! My father brought a lot of actors to town: wrestling matches, boxing matches, music. He had a big old aircraft hangar that he used as an auditorium. Rock and roll and wrestling kind of went together. The outward nature of rock and roll at this time made it so. But, for me, it was just normal business: wrestling every Wednesday, then every Friday night there was black dancing, and every Saturday night there was country dancing. I’ve been working for them since I was about six, selling pop and stuff. I’ve seen amazing people: T-Bone Walker, BB King, Jimmy Reed. Everyone came, because Lubbock was the only town of any size within three hundred miles.

What has it done in your life, and in the world of Lubbock, to have these outside influences?

It was like an atomic bomb. The city was so conservative. There were preachers who would go up to the pulpit and say, “On this day, bring these sounds of Satan to the fun fair and burn them in a bonfire.” How could a kid not like something that would do that to people?

My dad had been a baseball player and was sort of a local hero, so I think he dodged a lot of points with his finger. He brought Little Richard [to Lubbock], he summoned Elvis. In 1957, he had the first “Cosmopolitan Dance,” which was the first time that blacks, Hispanics, and whites were all in the same room. Ray Charles played it. Jo Harvey and I went. It was three small groups of paranoid, tight humans watching over their shoulders what the other group was going to do.

Rock and roll is that city sound, but the rural influence is also so crucial to its sound – it’s mixed with blues, country music, especially in those early years. So this is something that happens in these small towns, but it is also of them at the same time. And then you have Wolfman Jack, who you wrote a song about, who is this radio DJ from Brooklyn, who broadcasts from a station in Mexico, who plays rock and roll to the children of Lubbock. There is a real blurring of influences there.

I remember getting in a car and driving at night as fast as possible, listening to Wolfman Jack, who was playing music you had never heard – southern blues, rhythm and blues, doo wop . It was a bit perfect. There was a kind of weirdness in what was on the air – there was a Bible seller who came after Wolfman Jack who literally sold autographed pictures of Jesus Christ, straight from the Holy Land. How do you lose, listening to something like that?


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‘It paid off’: Earl Smith, president of Hoffman Music at Spokane, looks back on decades-long career https://monroeswifts.org/it-paid-off-earl-smith-president-of-hoffman-music-at-spokane-looks-back-on-decades-long-career/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:24:17 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/it-paid-off-earl-smith-president-of-hoffman-music-at-spokane-looks-back-on-decades-long-career/ An aptitude test Earl Smith took while at North Central High School suggested he would excel in two areas: mechanics and music. The Spokane native can recall how the two, from a professional standpoint, seemed like a strange couple at first – at least until a test admin came up with an idea. “It was […]]]>

An aptitude test Earl Smith took while at North Central High School suggested he would excel in two areas: mechanics and music.

The Spokane native can recall how the two, from a professional standpoint, seemed like a strange couple at first – at least until a test admin came up with an idea.

“It was almost jokingly that the interviewer suggested, ‘Well, why not put them together and study musical instrument repair? “,” Smith said.

This is exactly what Smith did for more than seven decades at Hoffman Music in Spokane.

Hoffman Music, located at 1430 N. Monroe St., sells, rents, consigns and repairs musical instruments, including guitars and drums. The store also sells, repairs and consigns orchestral instruments.

Smith – now president of Hoffman at 89 – co-owns alongside his son, Allan and Kevin McLeish. McLeish is the son of Ernie McLeish, who served as president of Hoffman Music until his death in 2014.

The elder Smith has worked at Hoffman for 71 of the company‘s 113-year history, although his affiliation dates back beyond his career.

While Smith remembers how big sellers accordions were as a child in the early 1940s, his interest in music began with the trumpet. It was inspired by the North Central High School Marching Band; without access to a proper rehearsal space, the group often rehearsed while walking around their neighborhood, Smith said.

“The (marching) band was a powerful bunch with everything they played,” Smith said. “Like most bands, the dominant thing is the melody, and of course the trumpet is one of the dominant instruments in the melody. It was the sound of the instrument I had in mind, so that’s what got me started.

Smith said he got his first instrument – a bugle – around the age of 9. His first trumpet followed soon after, which led a childhood friend to suggest lessons at Hoffman Music.

Smith remembers how he took classes at Hoffman until his early days at North Central High School, where he then took classes with then-group principal Lowell Bradford. He said he also attended all of the music workshops available, including walking, concert, orchestral, pep and jazz groups.

“I really enjoyed everything I did around any music,” he said. “I should have found more time for academics, but I was too busy making music. But it’s OK. It paid off.

Until then, Smith’s work experience had consisted of mowing lawns, shoveling sidewalks, and other odd jobs in the neighborhood. However, he was interested in finding “real work” as he neared graduation, Smith said.

All the while, the results of the aptitude test remained etched in his mind.

Hoffman made logical sense, he said. After all, he went there often and knew a lot of people there. So he asked co-owner Bill Grafmiller, who was then head of the Hoffman Group’s Instruments Department, about a job.

Smith said he started out part-time sweeping the store, cleaning the horns and various other tasks. It grew over time with a sort of apprenticeship that taught him sales, customer service, and how to repair virtually any band and orchestral instrument, he said. He joined full time around 1950.

“I have to say that I have been totally and completely happy every day,” Smith said. “The experience I have had working side by side with tuners and piano technicians etc. and meeting many professional musicians passing through and entering the store.”

Smith started working at the store when Hoffman was located on West Riverside Avenue.

The store has moved several times, moving around 1990 to its current location on North Monroe Street. The company also has a separate location on West Sharp Avenue for services and installation of sound and public address systems.

He became part owner in the 1970s when the company was officially incorporated. Some notable professional musicians he says he has met over the years through Hoffman Music include trumpeters Harry James and Doc Severinsen.

School musicians, from elementary school to middle school, remained Hoffman Music’s main clientele throughout Smith’s career. Smith said Hoffman Music also lends instruments to local college music programs – especially those related to training future music teachers and conductors as an introduction to each instrument.

Guitars have always been the mainstay of the store’s sales, he said, while the popularity of other instruments and genres has grown and declined over the years. Nowadays, saxophones are quite popular, he said.

“Music touches everything and everyone,” Smith said. “Some in different ways.”

Smith and his wife, Myrtle, had two children, Allan and a daughter, Carol. Myrtle Smith died in 2017.

In addition to being a co-owner, Allan Smith is responsible for Hoffman’s Tape Department and Tape Repair Shop. He worked at Hoffman from the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s, starting as a janitor in what was a career similar to his father’s.

He left for other companies, but returned in the late 1990s after realizing that working at Hoffman was “what I wanted to do,” said Allan Smith.

“Anyone who ever worked for Hoffman’s, the only person they always remember works for my dad,” he said. “He has more patience than anyone I know. I continue to hope that the longer he is there, the more this patience rubs off on me.

“He’s a hard worker, but at the same time, it’s fun work. You don’t feel like you’re going to work, ”he added. “It’s also a job where there are a lot of people who have worked there and have been there for a long time.

Tom Schager, a local professional musician who worked for Hoffman for a few years in the early 1970s and knew Earl Smith over the years through other endeavors, described the Elder Smith as “one of the true icons. From the recent history of Spokane.

“There is no one else like him,” Schager said. “He’s more experienced than any individual I know, at least who’s still working. There were a lot of great people in Spokane who were involved in their own music stores or had their own music business, but he was the one who survived it all. He’s absolutely # 1 for me.

As for the elder Smith’s musical career, he decided to stop playing the trumpet when COVID-19 hit.

Smith said he was still active in several groups in the region before the COVID-19 pandemic, when pandemic restrictions closed any potential outings for those groups. On the business side, Hoffman Music was able to reformat stores in the months Hoffman was closed last year due to pandemic restrictions.

He was ready to retire from the game, anyway, he said.

“I knew I wasn’t going to play for a while,” Smith said. “As a trumpeter you have to play almost every day. To be a runner or weightlifter, it is not enough to sit down and, two or three months later, to come and take back your weights. Some guys do, but I don’t.

Scheduled to turn 90 in October, Smith said he had no specific plans for his future with Hoffman Music – other than planning to stay.

“Until they are fed up with me,” he joked. “My health is good. I have a lot of energy. I am here almost every day. I’m just happy that I can do what I’m doing and enjoy it.


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Mickey Guyton opens up about racism in the music industry https://monroeswifts.org/mickey-guyton-opens-up-about-racism-in-the-music-industry/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:00:34 +0000 https://monroeswifts.org/mickey-guyton-opens-up-about-racism-in-the-music-industry/ Mickey Guyton sits down with Latin pop superstar Becky G to offer a glimpse of her experience tackling racism and sexism in country music in a new clip from Facebook Watch that is being broadcast exclusively through Taste of Country and The Boot. “Do you feel, since you started, that there has been a change? […]]]>

Mickey Guyton sits down with Latin pop superstar Becky G to offer a glimpse of her experience tackling racism and sexism in country music in a new clip from Facebook Watch that is being broadcast exclusively through Taste of Country and The Boot.

“Do you feel, since you started, that there has been a change? Grammy-nominated country singer Becky G asks in exclusive Face to Face with Becky G below.

“Slow change,” Guyton replies. “But there has been change.”

“When I go back to Nashville, at these different awards shows, I see black people backstage, Latinos backstage, and that’s something I’ve never seen,” adds Guyton, who has spent nine years in Nashville before moving to Los Angeles. in 2020. “It’s so beautiful to see people realizing that we are so much better together than apart.”

“I love it”, answers Becky G. “I always say:” Juntos somos mas “ … together we are so much more. “

It has been an eventful year for Guyton. She performed “Black Like Me” at the 63rd Grammy Awards in March, where she was nominated for Best Country Solo Performance for the same song. In April, she made history when she became the first black woman to co-host the Academy of Country Music Awards. In September, Guyton released his long-awaited debut album, Remember his name, a decade after signing with Capitol Records Nashville in 2011.

Guyton promoted the album with an uplifting performance at the CMA Awards in November 2021, where she sang “Love My Hair” alongside Brittney Spencer and Madeline Edwards.

“Becky G & Mickey Guyton: Battling Systemic Racism in Country Music” premieres Tuesday (Jan. 4) at 12 p.m. ET on Facebook Watch.

Best Country Albums of 2021 – Critics’ Choice

This list of the top country albums of 2021 was curated by the staff at Taste of Country, with fan assistance and with industry acclaim and mainstream accessibility in mind.

Best Album of the Year is a traditional country record that makes subtle efforts to include more progressive fans. Elsewhere, find projects from a dynamic mix of artists and visionaries.


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